Mission Core

Janus Seminars 2017

The Janus Seminars are a semester-long conference on personal and professional identity development for first-year students as they transition into college.

We use the name Janus because, like Janus in Roman mythology, we want our students to be looking backward and forward at the same time—at who and where they have been and where they are going and who they want to be.

Each student must attend 13 seminars that are chosen to fit his or her schedule, interests, and needs over the course of the fall semester. Mission Core instructors will confirm how many total are needed. Two seminars will be required for all students: Preparing for LIB 199 and Preparing to Meet Your Academic Advisor.

Students choose their own seminars from the list below. Ask your Mission Core instructor for more details on how he or she would like you to turn in your responses to each seminar.

Seminars are available every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 11 am except where noted, along with “First Friday” seminar days that run from 9am – noon in the basement of the library (with refreshments available between seminars). This way, if you choose, you can complete three seminars in one day.

Also look for some special events on the calendar below that are included outside the regular times. Plan early so that you can attend the seminars of most value to you.

Ask your Mission Core instructor for more information.

Friday, August 25 - Last Day to either Drop Without a "W" and/or Add a Regular Semester Course

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Fontbonne Art Gallery Visit

    Library 05

    Presented by Flores/Brochardt.
    One of our campus’ great resources is our Art Gallery which houses student and professional work. We will explore the art in the gallery and talk about the process of curating a gallery and how to access art in other galleries.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Understanding the Importance of Etiquette

    Library 06

    Presented by Beaver.
    This seminar takes a cursory examination of social and business interactions beyond the educational setting, helping students to learn more about how to behave once they are in their field of work.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    The Academic Hat Tip: Giving Credit, Understanding & Avoiding Plagiarism

    Library 10

    Presented by Whicker.
    This presentation will discuss the ethical use of others’ ideas, what plagiarism is, and how to be sure to avoid it (both the temptation to knowingly cheat and accidental mishandling of source materials). It will also explain the general principles of citation with a comparison of several citation styles and various ways to successfully integrate source material into writing.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Myth Busters: & Common Myths that Can Bust Your Success

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Simons.
    “I study better with the music on.” “It’s okay to leave it to the last minute – I work better under pressure.” Sound familiar? This workshop will bust common myths students have believed for generations. By exploring the fundamentals to successful learning, students will learn how to maximize their potential for academic success. This workshop is designed for all students.

Monday, August 28, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Intro to Living on Campus

    Library 06

    Presented by Friedhoff.
    This session will go over how to make the most of freshman’s residential experience and life in St. Joe. We will help residents in developing their own sense of community and how they can get more engaged on campus through residential life. This will also be used as a way to engage residents in a conversation in what they would like to see occur in the year to come as they proceed through their first year in the residents halls.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Creativity and the Common Good

    Library 10

    Presented by Ridlen.
    This seminar will take a look at creativity and the role it plays in one’s identity, life style, growth mind set and ultimately its importance to the common good. Discussion will center around two short videos Embrace the Shake and Alike.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Are You 1G?

    Library 05

    Presented by Simons.
    Audience: Students who are first-generation (1G), meaning those whose parent(s)/guardian(s) did not complete a four-year degree. This seminar focuses on “first-generation” as a component of students’ personal identities that entails unique challenges and strengths. Through exploration of topics such as cultural capital, privilege, hidden curriculum, imposter syndrome, self-efficacy, and available resources first-generation students will develop a deeper understanding of what it means to be 1G. They will also develop a sense of pride and community related to their first-generation identity through discussions about their individual and collective strengths, the contributions first-generation students make to the campus, and by hearing from student first-gen speakers.

Wednesday, August 30 - Convocation in the Gym - No Janus Seminars

Friday, September 1, 2017

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Financial Aid 101

    Library 05

    Presented by Kearney.
    General information regarding financial aid, financial literacy and other financial issues will be presented.

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Stress Management/Reduction Workshop

    Library 06

    Presented by Phelps.
    Want to find ways to make your student career less stressful and even relaxing? Sign up for this workshop to learn relaxation technique that is useful and easy to do. You will also get information on the health benefits from stress management techniques and demonstrations on energy/bodywork modalities such as: Reiki, Craniosacral Therapy, Healing Touch, and Massage therapy. No preparation is necessary. Come to learn and enjoy and gain the tools to become present, peaceful, centered, and balanced on physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual levels.

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Introducing TELOS, Fontbonne's New Honors Program

    Library 10

    Presented by Wohlford.
    Hear about the brand new honors program at Fontbonne. It is open to students with high levels of creativity, engagement, and curiosity. The presenter is the director of the program and will explain how it works, why you should consider applying even if you don’t think of yourself as a traditional honors student, and how Fontbonne’s program is much different than other honors programs.

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Intro to Living on Campus

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Friedhoff.
    This session will go over how to make the most of freshman’s residential experience and life in St. Joe. We will help residents in developing their own sense of community and how they can get more engaged on campus through residential life. This will also be used as a way to engage residents in a conversation in what they would like to see occur in the year to come as they proceed through their first year in the residents halls.

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Woman in a Man's Industry

    Library 05

    Presented by Buckel.
    How to be a successful woman in a male dominated field. Discussion on missteps and important strategies to climb the male ladder. As a female athletic director, I have experienced a lot of challenging moments that I never expected to experience as well as have often been the only woman with a seat at the decision-making table. I will share my experiences with our students, both male and female, in hopes to better prepare them for the hurdles that they may face.

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Crash Course: Punctuation

    Library 06

    Presented by Wohlford.
    Get a quick review of the basics of punctuation, including comma rules and other nuts and bolts.  Don’t go on guessing any longer!

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Growth & Improvement

    Library 10

    Presented by O’Hara.
    The presentation would focus on appropriate goal setting, scheduling of time to accomplish goals, and how to handle obstacles that may keep us from meeting our goals and improving ourselves.

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Historical "Tour" of Fontbonne's Campus

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Matz.
    This seminar is about the history of Fontbonne’s campus and the role of the CSJs in its founding, with additional information about the life/contributions of John D. Ryan to the campus, in recognition of which Administration Hall was renamed to Ryan Hall in the mid-1920s.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Numbers Gone Wild! (Lib 05)

    Library 05

    Presented by Roy.
    In this session, we will explore quantitative quantities that college students should consider in decision-making. These topics include the impact low grades have on GPA, the cost of having to repeat a course, how to calculate grade needed on final exam, the effect credit card interest may have on debt and other related topics.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Getting Around Saint Louis- CANCELLED

    Library 10

    Presented by Flores
    It is so helpful and important to have access to the city you’re living in. One of the great resources for mobility in this city is our public transit system. This will be an intro exploration into using public transportation and getting out into our city. We will take a bus and a the Metro to explore the city in a unique and affordable way. The students will need $3 in cash.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Athletics and Academics

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Graves.
    The Faculty Athletic Representative, FAR, is the liaison between the student-athlete and their academics. When issues arise, whether it be illness, injury, faculty not letting the student-athlete to make-up work or tests due to conflicts with games, or other items the FAR is able to help the student-athlete resolve some of these issues. Also, the student-athlete needs to understand his/her responsibilities when juggling their academics along with their sport.

Monday, September 4 - Labor Day - No Janus Seminars

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Myth Busters: & Common Myths that Can Bust Your Success

    Library 05

    Presented by Simons.
    “I study better with the music on.” “It’s okay to leave it to the last minute – I work better under pressure.” Sound familiar? This workshop will bust common myths students have believed for generations. By exploring the fundamentals to successful learning, students will learn how to maximize their potential for academic success. This workshop is designed for all students.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Commuter Students

    Library 06

    Presented by Hermann.
    In this session, find out about ways commuter students can become active participants in campus life.  Make sure your campus experience is more than just classes!

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    The Liberal Arts: What and Why?

    Library 10

    Presented by Weyhaupt.
    It’s bound to happen … you are at a family party, and your uncle/aunt/cousin corners you with this question: “Fontbonne? Isn’t that a liberal arts school? Why did you go there?” In this presentation, we’ll explain what “the liberal arts” are, address some common misconceptions, and help you mount a full-throated defense of the liberal arts.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    How to Succeed in Your First College Math Course

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Abkemeier.
    Many students fear the dreaded subject known as mathematics. This workshop will be a user-friendly and practical guide for those students wanting to master this harrowing and difficult subject with academic success. Advice about absorbing all the knowledge one can in mathematics classes, fighting off anxiety and just dealing better with math classes will be presented. This class will not guarantee that a student will be successful in his/her first math class. The emphasis will be on the work he/she must do, but with the promise that success is possible if one sticks to a plan of actions.

    Some of the topics that may be addressed are: Math study skills, how studying math is different from studying other subjects and how college math is different from high school math, tips on problem solving and how to study for math tests.

Friday, September 8, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    How to Be a Healthy Griffin!

    Library 05

    Presented by Hickman/Hagan.
    Good physical health can be a challenge to college students; weight gain (a.k.a “The Freshman 15”), lack of physical activity, poor sleep, homesickness, physical and mental illnesses. This class will be interactive and fun! Learn how to make a plan staying healthy while studying in college. Learn how to recognize three danger zones as well as learn the basic corner stones to good health.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Participating Effectively in Class

    Library 10

    Presented by Williamson.
    In this session, we’ll talk about how to participate in class effectively—especially if you don’t always feel comfortable doing so. We’ll discuss multiple ways to be an active participant in your classes, along with tips you can use to prepare for active class preparation.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Fontbonne Art Gallery Visit

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Flores/Brochardt.
    One of our campus’ great resources is our Art Gallery which houses student and professional work. We will explore the art in the gallery and talk about the process of curating a gallery and how to access art in other galleries.

Monday, September 11 - All Campus Meeting in the Gym - No Janus Seminars

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    On Your Way to Mastery: Understanding & Applying the 5 Elements of Writing at Fontbonne

    Library 05

    Presented by Sweeney.
    This presentation will identify the five elements of writing at Fontbonne – focus, organization, development, conventions, and style – and illustrate how these elements work in a typical assignment: an article summary/analysis. The presentation will employ oral and visual presentation (PowerPoint), hands-on work, and discussion.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Squeezing the Juice Out of All the Libraries Available to You for Both School & Pleasure

    Library 06

    Presented by Glenshaw.
    We are always happy to see so many students using the Taylor Library here at Fontbonne. We take pride of our excellent selection of over 90, 000 physical volumes, over 170,00 e-books and over 69,000 journals, magazines and newspapers but, as a student, do you know how much more is available to you? Fontbonne is part of the MOBIUS library consortium which has over 27 million items available to you. And since MOBIUS is connected with the Prospector library consortium, Prospector’s 34 million items are also available to you. What about the four public library systems in the St. Louis area available to many Fontbonne students? Millions more items just sitting there for your use. And not just for homework, papers and projects but also for your own personal pleasure, interest and passions. And not just books but DVDs, CDs, e-books, magazines and more. I will share with you this vast array of library resources available to you and get your toes wet in how to use them.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Commuter Students

    Library 10

    Presented by Hermann.
    In this session, find out about ways commuter students can become active participants in campus life.  Make sure your campus experience is more than just classes!

Friday, September 15, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    The Liberal Arts: What and Why? (Lib 05)

    Library 05

    Presented by Weyhaupt.
    It’s bound to happen … you are at a family party, and your uncle/aunt/cousin corners you with this question: “Fontbonne? Isn’t that a liberal arts school? Why did you go there?” In this presentation, we’ll explain what “the liberal arts” are, address some common misconceptions, and help you mount a full-throated defense of the liberal arts.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Show Me the Money? Figuring Out What is Important

    Library 06

    Presented by Keller.
    This interactive workshop uses a values card sort to help you assess your values, likes, and dislikes—and helps you figure out your ideal career path. This presentation will start with a short conversation on the definition and differences between one’s values and career-related values, where our values come from, and why it’s important to know one’s career-related values early in the process of making career decisions. We’ll also discuss why our career-related values change over time, helping students understand the importance of paying attention to what’s important to them and giving them permission to change their career ideas if and when their values change. You will walk away knowing their top six career-related values, and you will learn how to best reflect on what is important to you and how to use your values to guide their career research. To that end, you will write down three questions you’ll need to ask yourself and career professionals – and how to do that – in the next 2-3 years as you plan for the future.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Forest Park: Where You Can Grow as a Student & Budding Professional

    Library 10

    Presented by Glenshaw.
    This seminar will help you start to use Forest Park for your work as a student and budding professional. In addition to the opportunities for recreation and relaxation, Forest Park is also a superb resource to use for both your course work and for your professional development. Regarding course work and the park, when you are working on a paper, project or presentation, think about how you connect to Forest Park itself and/or its many institutions. For example, sports management: There are sports leagues that use the facilities of Forest Park and the park has two golf courses, a tennis center and more. How are these leagues and facilities managed? Who manages them and how do the private companies interact and intersect with the city government and Forest Park Forever, the two organizations that operate the park? Almost every major, degree program and field of study can use the lens of Forest Park to find real world examples and applications. As far as professional development is concerned, Forest Park is home to: 5 top flight cultural institutions, 6 city government departments or agencies, an award-winning non-profit conservancy and 8 dining locations run by 7 different catering companies. Some of these institutions have unique specializations and opportunities abound for internships, part-time jobs, and volunteering to learn about their specific fields. In addition to these more specialized fields, most, if not all, of these institutions/organizations have similar departments in common such as: education, human resources, community development, marketing, financial management/accounting, fundraising, information technology, and many more. As such, opportunities again abound for internships, part-time jobs, and volunteering to learn about these areas that the institutions have in common.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Intro to Living on Campus

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Friedhoff.
    This session will go over how to make the most of freshman’s residential experience and life in St. Joe. We will help residents in developing their own sense of community and how they can get more engaged on campus through residential life. This will also be used as a way to engage residents in a conversation in what they would like to see occur in the year to come as they proceed through their first year in the residents halls.

Monday, September 18, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    How to Be a Healthy Griffin!

    Library 05

    Presented by Hickman/Hagan.
    Good physical health can be a challenge to college students; weight gain (a.k.a “The Freshman 15”), lack of physical activity, poor sleep, homesickness, physical and mental illnesses. This class will be interactive and fun! Learn how to make a plan staying healthy while studying in college. Learn how to recognize three danger zones as well as learn the basic corner stones to good health.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Introducing TELOS, Fontbonne's New Honors Program

    Library 06

    Presented by Wohlford.
    Hear about the brand new honors program at Fontbonne. It is open to students with high levels of creativity, engagement, and curiosity. The presenter is the director of the program and will explain how it works, why you should consider applying even if you don’t think of yourself as a traditional honors student, and how Fontbonne’s program is much different than other honors programs.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    How to Succeed in Your First College Math Course

    Library 10

    Presented by Abkemeier.
    Many students fear the dreaded subject known as mathematics. This workshop will be a user-friendly and practical guide for those students wanting to master this harrowing and difficult subject with academic success. Advice about absorbing all the knowledge one can in mathematics classes, fighting off anxiety and just dealing better with math classes will be presented. This class will not guarantee that a student will be successful in his/her first math class. The emphasis will be on the work he/she must do, but with the promise that success is possible if one sticks to a plan of actions.

    Some of the topics that may be addressed are: Math study skills, how studying math is different from studying other subjects and how college math is different from high school math, tips on problem solving and how to study for math tests.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Networking 101 - A Career Fair Prep Workshop

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Keller.
    Take a deep dive into the sea of networking! This workshop is designed to prepare students for the Career Fair on September 28, 2017. Students will learn the art of networking, including how to get into and out of conversations, as well as proper etiquette and attire for attending networking events. We will also discuss the purpose of a career fair and how to prepare for success. This workshop will provide each student with an opportunity to develop an “elevator pitch” and practice a professional handshake.

Wednesday, September 20 - Faculty General Assembly - No Janus Seminars

Friday, September 22, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Library 05

    Presented by Finley/Voss.
    Learn about different study methods and which ones work the best, according to research. Participate in a demonstration to see how retrieval practice can improve your memory for course content. The best way to study is to QUIZ YOURSELF!

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Networking 101 - A Career Fair Prep Workshop

    Library 06

    Presented by Keller.
    Take a deep dive into the sea of networking! This workshop is designed to prepare students for the Career Fair on September 28, 2017. Students will learn the art of networking, including how to get into and out of conversations, as well as proper etiquette and attire for attending networking events. We will also discuss the purpose of a career fair and how to prepare for success. This workshop will provide each student with an opportunity to develop an “elevator pitch” and practice a professional handshake.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Squeezing the Juice Out of All the Libraries Available to You for Both School & Pleasure (Lib 10)

    Library 10

    Presented by Glenshaw.
    We are always happy to see so many students using the Taylor Library here at Fontbonne. We take pride of our excellent selection of over 90, 000 physical volumes, over 170,00 e-books and over 69,000 journals, magazines and newspapers but, as a student, do you know how much more is available to you? Fontbonne is part of the MOBIUS library consortium which has over 27 million items available to you. And since MOBIUS is connected with the Prospector library consortium, Prospector’s 34 million items are also available to you. What about the four public library systems in the St. Louis area available to many Fontbonne students? Millions more items just sitting there for your use. And not just for homework, papers and projects but also for your own personal pleasure, interest and passions. And not just books but DVDs, CDs, e-books, magazines and more. I will share with you this vast array of library resources available to you and get your toes wet in how to use them.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Understanding the Importance of Etiquette

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Beaver.
    This seminar takes a cursory examination of social and business interactions beyond the educational setting, helping students to learn more about how to behave once they are in their field of work.

Monday, September 25, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Myth Busters: & Common Myths that Can Bust Your Success

    Library 05

    Presented by Simons.
    “I study better with the music on.” “It’s okay to leave it to the last minute – I work better under pressure.” Sound familiar? This workshop will bust common myths students have believed for generations. By exploring the fundamentals to successful learning, students will learn how to maximize their potential for academic success. This workshop is designed for all students.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Understanding the Importance of Etiquette

    Library 10

    Presented by Beaver
    This seminar takes a cursory examination of social and business interactions beyond the educational setting, helping students to learn more about how to behave once they are in their field of work.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Fake News: What Makes Quality Journalism & How to Decode the News?

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Flores.
    To be an informed member of society we have to stay up-to-date on current affairs. There is a lot of reporting and misinformation, especially online, how can we decipher what is quality and what is fake news.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Confidently Integrating Research in College Writing

    Library 05

    Presented by Muldoon.
    One of the challenges of college writing is effectively integrating research into papers while avoiding any possibilities of plagiarism. This seminar will be a hands-on workshop for students to apply key elements of MLA research format. Students will paraphrase and summarize material from different types of research texts, use different in-text citation strategies, and create a Works Cited page. Students will also read and discuss Fontbonne University’s policy on plagiarism and its consequences in order to be better able to use research in an appropriate way.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Living Well as a College Student

    Library 06

    Presented by Charles.
    Before arriving at college many students have had direct guidance from parents, from the school, or from a coach in organized sports. When coming in as a first year college student, taking care of oneself can be a shock. This workshop would help provide first year students with the tools to live well on their own. The content of the workshop will start out with discussing exercise. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations will be discussed, along with different forms of exercise addressing both formal and informal types. After providing the information to the participants, a group discussion will then be held surrounding different types of exercise that people take part in. Demonstrating the different ways people exercise and how they fit it into their busy schedules. The content will then move into healthy eating. Covering the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommended MyPlate and USDA recommended general nutrition facts about each food group. Blank sample forms of MyPlate will be given to participants to evaluate current eating patterns and what a balanced meal might look like for each individual. This leads directly into looking at new responsibility as a college student and the balance that it takes. New responsibilities will be taken directly from workshop members, and ideas for ways to handle and balance responsibilities will be discussed by the workshop attendees. Next, the content will contain different types of stress and how we deal with stress. Types of stress will come from the workshop participants and so will different ways of dealing with stress through group discussion. This portion would end with a short guided imagery for stress relief that the participants can take with them. Lastly, we would introduce the Health and Behavior Coaching that is offered on campus in the Counseling and Wellness Department. This will let the students know that they have support at the University to continue on their wellness journey. By giving the first year student’s access to these tools, it can improve their overall success not only in their first year, but also throughout life.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Should I Be Writing This Down? Effective Note-Taking for Learning

    Library 10

    Presented by Oliverio.
    Many students, even upper-level college students, struggle with knowing how and when to take notes. This seminar will address note-taking during in-class lectures/discussions. The seminar, aimed primarily at first-year students, will explore a variety of note-taking methods—from visual note-taking to Cornell notes to outlines. We will also look at a number of digital systems for storing and retrieving notes, such as Evernote and Onenote. Most importantly, though, we focus on what to take notes on by paying special attention to cues in both lectures and tests. The format will consist of a presentation and practice of visual note-taking (markers and crayons included).

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Intro to Living on Campus

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Friedhoff.
    This session will go over how to make the most of freshman’s residential experience and life in St. Joe. We will help residents in developing their own sense of community and how they can get more engaged on campus through residential life. This will also be used as a way to engage residents in a conversation in what they would like to see occur in the year to come as they proceed through their first year in the residents halls.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

  • 7 - 8:00 p.m.

    From Tolerance to Respect: Being Catholic & Being Protestant Since the Reformation

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Matz – Panel Event.

Friday, September 29, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Choosing a Major, Choosing Freedom

    Library 05

    Presented by Eiler.
    What does a beginning college student have in common with the main character Rey in Star Wars VII? In a word – freedom. But, like Rey, you are not only free to choose your own future, you are completely alone in your responsibility to choose it. With freedom comes the power to choose. And with choice comes the responsibility of owning your decisions. This seminar will explore the challenges of choosing the major that will impact the rest of your life.

    Between right now and retirement, you will spend approximately 35% of all waking hours at work (work days consume 50% of waking hours). Assuming a correlation between college major and future employment, your choosing a major is one of the biggest decisions you’ll ever make. Only you can make that decision. Only you can be credited or blamed – that’s both scary and empowering! Kind of a big deal, eh?!?! Welcome to college.

    And how should you choose a major? Should you listen to your parents, teachers or advisors? Choose something practical? Copy your friends? Though these things can matter, they can also be detrimental to any path that does not include the most important perspective – YOURS! But, just as Rey is asked in the Star Wars VII trailer, we’ll ask you: “Who are you?” Your answer to that question is important, and has a lot to do with choosing the right major.

    This workshop will pursue three main goals: to deconstruct the self in order to better understand it; to define happiness and what it means for you; and, finally, to consider possible majors that reflect your answers to the previous two goals. Choose a major without thinking and enjoy regret for the rest of your life – that is the path to the dark side. The path to the light requires contemplation and forethought – this is your life, and you’re free to choose!

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Yoga in Daily Life: Benefits & Practices to Enhance Well-Being

    Library 06

    Presented by French.
    Yoga is an ancient set of practices involving much more than the traditionally thought of physical postures. In this seminar, students will learn about the numerous physical and mental benefits of yoga. Participants will also gain strategies that may foster an increased sense of focus, calm, and balance in their daily lives. Although we will not fully engage in a physical practice, students are encouraged to wear comfortable clothing and should expect to try mini versions of techniques presented throughout class. This seminar will be led by Dena French, a long time practitioner of yoga who is registered with Yoga Alliance as an RYT-200 level teacher. Dena discovered yoga during her first year of college when she enrolled in a class for required PE credit. She is excited to share concepts of yoga with college students who might benefit from adding the practice to their daily lives.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Beyond Intelligence: Habits, Mindset & Grit

    Lewis Room

    Presented by DeLaet.
    Grit is a better predictor of GPA and graduation than IQ, which is a better predictor of the ability to take standardized tests. Yet, grit can only happen with a Growth Mindset, but how do you get there? Find out what to do when things don’t go the way you thought you wanted.

Monday, October 2, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Understanding Your Learning Style

    Library 05

    Presented by Simons.
    Students will take a learning style assessment and will be provided with written material about tips and strategies to use for each learning style. The majority of the session will focus on discussion about each learning style with plenty of examples and opportunity for discussion.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Practicing Allyship: Race & Social Justice

    Library 06

    Presented by Voss.
    Becoming an ally involves a person of privilege actively, intentionally unlearning and reevaluating their beliefs, behaviors, and systemic influences to join in solidarity with a marginalized group of people (adapted from The Anti-Oppression Network). Allies work with those experiencing oppression in order to help end the system of oppression. Allies recognize that members of the dominant/privileged group are also harmed by the system of oppression, thus seek those benefits which come from ending oppression for all. In this seminar, through a brief process of self-reflection followed by some grounding thoughts on understanding race and racism, we will begin to explore those responsibilities, roles and behaviors needed to practice allyship.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Creativity and the Common Good

    Library 10

    Presented by Ridlen.
    This seminar will take a look at creativity and the role it plays in one’s identity, life style, growth mind set and ultimately its importance to the common good. Discussion will center around two short videos Embrace the Shake and Alike.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Fake News: What Makes Quality Journalism & How to Decode the News?

    Library 05

    Presented by Flores.
    To be an informed member of society we have to stay up-to-date on current affairs. There is a lot of reporting and misinformation, especially online, how can we decipher what is quality and what is fake news.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Learning How to Learn

    Library 06

    Presented by Simons.
    This foundational workshop will help students explore how the brain learns. Areas covered in this workshop include: learning styles, preparation of the brain, memory, and focus. By learning the basics of how the brain acquires and analyzes new information, students will be better able to adapt themselves to learning in the college environment. This workshop is designed for all students.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Preparing for LIB 199 - begins Oct. 18th

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Portman.
    Information Literacy in Higher Education (LIB 199) is an essential part of the General Education curriculum and a great opportunity to step up your research game in your other classes. This session will give you a head start by offering an overview of what to expect in LIB199 and will share strategies for succeeding in the online college classroom. We’ll address the importance of self-discipline and time management skills, which are key in developing independent learning habits and maintaining engagement with the course content. LIB 199 will help you get acquainted with college-level research and everything the library has to offer — find out why it all matters here!

Friday, October 6, 2017

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Living Well as a College Student

    Library 05

    Presented by Charles.
    Before arriving at college many students have had direct guidance from parents, from the school, or from a coach in organized sports. When coming in as a first year college student, taking care of oneself can be a shock. This workshop would help provide first year students with the tools to live well on their own. The content of the workshop will start out with discussing exercise. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations will be discussed, along with different forms of exercise addressing both formal and informal types. After providing the information to the participants, a group discussion will then be held surrounding different types of exercise that people take part in. Demonstrating the different ways people exercise and how they fit it into their busy schedules. The content will then move into healthy eating. Covering the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommended MyPlate and USDA recommended general nutrition facts about each food group. Blank sample forms of MyPlate will be given to participants to evaluate current eating patterns and what a balanced meal might look like for each individual. This leads directly into looking at new responsibility as a college student and the balance that it takes. New responsibilities will be taken directly from workshop members, and ideas for ways to handle and balance responsibilities will be discussed by the workshop attendees. Next, the content will contain different types of stress and how we deal with stress. Types of stress will come from the workshop participants and so will different ways of dealing with stress through group discussion. This portion would end with a short guided imagery for stress relief that the participants can take with them. Lastly, we would introduce the Health and Behavior Coaching that is offered on campus in the Counseling and Wellness Department. This will let the students know that they have support at the University to continue on their wellness journey. By giving the first year student’s access to these tools, it can improve their overall success not only in their first year, but also throughout life.

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Getting Around Saint Louis - CANCELLED

    Library 06

    Presented by Flores.
    It is so helpful and important to have access to the city you’re living in. One of the great resources for mobility in this city is our public transit system. This will be an intro exploration into using public transportation and getting out into our city. We will take a bus and a the Metro to explore the city in a unique and affordable way. The students will need $3 in cash.

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Financial Aid 101

    Library 10

    Presented by Kearney.
    General information regarding financial aid, financial literacy and other financial issues will be presented.

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Resume Development for the First-Year Student

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Keller.
    Students will learn how to create a professional resume in this workshop; they will assess their skills and start the process of developing their own document. Students will understand the type of resume that is most successfully used in their career field, and the types of skills that are sought after by employers and graduate schools. This workshop will challenge students to reflect on their co-curricular experiences, leadership roles, and volunteer work to develop a resume that effectively highlights their skills and accomplishments.

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Athletics and Academics

    Library 05

    Presented by Graves.
    The Faculty Athletic Representative, FAR, is the liaison between the student-athlete and their academics. When issues arise, whether it be illness, injury, faculty not letting the student-athlete to make-up work or tests due to conflicts with games, or other items the FAR is able to help the student-athlete resolve some of these issues. Also, the student-athlete needs to understand his/her responsibilities when juggling their academics along with their sport.

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Spirituality of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet

    Library 06

    Presented by Helfrich/Markway.
    Learn about the spirituality of Fontbonne’s founders, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet with an engaging presentation that looks at the characteristics of the CSJ spirituality and ways that you can grow in this spirituality as a student. “To bring unity of neighbor with neighbor and neighbor with God.” This language may seem strange, coming as it does from seventeenth-century France, but the concepts and ideals are absolutely timeless.

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Social Media Representation Workshop

    Library 10

    Presented by Keller.
    Students will have the opportunity to learn how to use social media platforms to their advantage. Students will learn to look at their own accounts from an outside perspective and also gain that perspective from other students, and be able to recognize if their social media persona matches the one they put forth in the real world, and learn how to make adjustments to present their most authentic self. Each student will look at how they can improve their accounts based on their values, and will have the opportunity to outline a plan on how they will present themselves digitally in the future.

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Yoga in Daily Life: Benefits & Practices to Enhance Well-Being

    Lewis Room

    Presented by French.
    Yoga is an ancient set of practices involving much more than the traditionally thought of physical postures. In this seminar, students will learn about the numerous physical and mental benefits of yoga. Participants will also gain strategies that may foster an increased sense of focus, calm, and balance in their daily lives. Although we will not fully engage in a physical practice, students are encouraged to wear comfortable clothing and should expect to try mini versions of techniques presented throughout class. This seminar will be led by Dena French, a long time practitioner of yoga who is registered with Yoga Alliance as an RYT-200 level teacher. Dena discovered yoga during her first year of college when she enrolled in a class for required PE credit. She is excited to share concepts of yoga with college students who might benefit from adding the practice to their daily lives.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Athletics and Academics

    Library 05

    Presented by Graves.
    The Faculty Athletic Representative, FAR, is the liaison between the student-athlete and their academics. When issues arise, whether it be illness, injury, faculty not letting the student-athlete to make-up work or tests due to conflicts with games, or other items the FAR is able to help the student-athlete resolve some of these issues. Also, the student-athlete needs to understand his/her responsibilities when juggling their academics along with their sport.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Numbers Gone Wild!

    Library 06

    Presented by Roy.
    In this session, we will explore quantitative quantities that college students should consider in decision-making. These topics include the impact low grades have on GPA, the cost of having to repeat a course, how to calculate grade needed on final exam, the effect credit card interest may have on debt and other related topics.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Getting Around Saint Louis- CANCELLED

    Library 10

    Presented by Flores
    It is so helpful and important to have access to the city you’re living in. One of the great resources for mobility in this city is our public transit system. This will be an intro exploration into using public transportation and getting out into our city. We will take a bus and a the Metro to explore the city in a unique and affordable way. The students will need $3 in cash.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Historical "Tour" of Fontbonne's Campus

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Matz.
    This seminar is about the history of Fontbonne’s campus and the role of the CSJs in its founding, with additional information about the life/contributions of John D. Ryan to the campus, in recognition of which Administration Hall was renamed to Ryan Hall in the mid-1920s.

Monday, October 9, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    The 4-Year Plan: Creating Your Pre-Professional Portfolio

    Library 05

    Presented by Harris.
    Being a college student is a pre-professional, full-time job. Therefore, this presentation will examine the philosophy and benefits of creating a pre-professional portfolio, the documents and materials to include, and how students can use this portfolio to achieve their collegiate 4-year plan goals ultimately leading to graduation. Components of the college student experience, suggested methods, and tools will be discussed.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    On Your Way to Mastery: Understanding & Applying the 5 Elements of Writing at Fontbonne

    Library 06

    Presented by Sweeney.
    This presentation will identify the five elements of writing at Fontbonne – focus, organization, development, conventions, and style – and illustrate how these elements work in a typical assignment: an article summary/analysis. The presentation will employ oral and visual presentation (PowerPoint), hands-on work, and discussion.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Should I Be Writing This Down? Effective Note-Taking for Learning

    Library 10

    Presented by Oliverio.
    Many students, even upper-level college students, struggle with knowing how and when to take notes. This seminar will address note-taking during in-class lectures/discussions. The seminar, aimed primarily at first-year students, will explore a variety of note-taking methods—from visual note-taking to Cornell notes to outlines. We will also look at a number of digital systems for storing and retrieving notes, such as Evernote and Onenote. Most importantly, though, we focus on what to take notes on by paying special attention to cues in both lectures and tests. The format will consist of a presentation and practice of visual note-taking (markers and crayons included).

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Preparing for LIB 199 - begins Oct. 18th

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Portman.
    Information Literacy in Higher Education (LIB 199) is an essential part of the General Education curriculum and a great opportunity to step up your research game in your other classes. This session will give you a head start by offering an overview of what to expect in LIB199 and will share strategies for succeeding in the online college classroom. We’ll address the importance of self-discipline and time management skills, which are key in developing independent learning habits and maintaining engagement with the course content. LIB 199 will help you get acquainted with college-level research and everything the library has to offer — find out why it all matters here!

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Growth & Improvement

    Library 05

    Presented by O’Hara.
    The presentation would focus on appropriate goal setting, scheduling of time to accomplish goals, and how to handle obstacles that may keep us from meeting our goals and improving ourselves.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    The Liberal Arts: What and Why? - CANCELLED

    Library 06

    Presented by Weyhaupt.
    It’s bound to happen … you are at a family party, and your uncle/aunt/cousin corners you with this question: “Fontbonne? Isn’t that a liberal arts school? Why did you go there?” In this presentation, we’ll explain what “the liberal arts” are, address some common misconceptions, and help you mount a full-throated defense of the liberal arts.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Quest Leadership

    Library 10

    Presented by Hickle.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Preparing for LIB 199 - begins Oct. 18th

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Portman.
    Information Literacy in Higher Education (LIB 199) is an essential part of the General Education curriculum and a great opportunity to step up your research game in your other classes. This session will give you a head start by offering an overview of what to expect in LIB199 and will share strategies for succeeding in the online college classroom. We’ll address the importance of self-discipline and time management skills, which are key in developing independent learning habits and maintaining engagement with the course content. LIB 199 will help you get acquainted with college-level research and everything the library has to offer — find out why it all matters here!

Friday, October 13 - Midsemester/Last Day to Drop a Regular Semester Course

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Choosing a Major, Choosing Freedom

    Library 05

    Presented by Eiler.
    What does a beginning college student have in common with the main character Rey in Star Wars VII? In a word – freedom. But, like Rey, you are not only free to choose your own future, you are completely alone in your responsibility to choose it. With freedom comes the power to choose. And with choice comes the responsibility of owning your decisions. This seminar will explore the challenges of choosing the major that will impact the rest of your life.

    Between right now and retirement, you will spend approximately 35% of all waking hours at work (work days consume 50% of waking hours). Assuming a correlation between college major and future employment, your choosing a major is one of the biggest decisions you’ll ever make. Only you can make that decision. Only you can be credited or blamed – that’s both scary and empowering! Kind of a big deal, eh?!?! Welcome to college.

    And how should you choose a major? Should you listen to your parents, teachers or advisors? Choose something practical? Copy your friends? Though these things can matter, they can also be detrimental to any path that does not include the most important perspective – YOURS! But, just as Rey is asked in the Star Wars VII trailer, we’ll ask you: “Who are you?” Your answer to that question is important, and has a lot to do with choosing the right major.

    This workshop will pursue three main goals: to deconstruct the self in order to better understand it; to define happiness and what it means for you; and, finally, to consider possible majors that reflect your answers to the previous two goals. Choose a major without thinking and enjoy regret for the rest of your life – that is the path to the dark side. The path to the light requires contemplation and forethought – this is your life, and you’re free to choose!

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Spirituality of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet

    Library 06

    Presented by Helfrich/Markway.
    Learn about the spirituality of Fontbonne’s founders, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet with an engaging presentation that looks at the characteristics of the CSJ spirituality and ways that you can grow in this spirituality as a student. “To bring unity of neighbor with neighbor and neighbor with God.” This language may seem strange, coming as it does from seventeenth-century France, but the concepts and ideals are absolutely timeless.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Communicating with Professors

    Library 10

    Presented by Adams.
    Meet with Vice President for Academic Affairs, Carey Adams, who holds a PhD in Communication, to learn about ways to communicate with your professors that are professional and effective.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Preparing for LIB 199 - begins Oct. 18th

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Portman.
    Information Literacy in Higher Education (LIB 199) is an essential part of the General Education curriculum and a great opportunity to step up your research game in your other classes. This session will give you a head start by offering an overview of what to expect in LIB199 and will share strategies for succeeding in the online college classroom. We’ll address the importance of self-discipline and time management skills, which are key in developing independent learning habits and maintaining engagement with the course content. LIB 199 will help you get acquainted with college-level research and everything the library has to offer — find out why it all matters here!

Monday, October 16 - Fall Break - No Janus Seminars

Wednesday, October 18 - Faculty General Assembly - No Janus Seminars

Thursday, October 19, 2017 - Carondelet Lecture

  • 7 - 8:00 p.m.

    Reconstructing Catholic Identity Since the Reformation

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Matz.

Friday, October 20, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Participating Effectively in Class

    Library 05

    Presented by Williamson.
    In this session, we’ll talk about how to participate in class effectively—especially if you don’t always feel comfortable doing so. We’ll discuss multiple ways to be an active participant in your classes, along with tips you can use to prepare for active class preparation.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Stress Management/Reduction Workshop

    Library 06

    Presented by Phelps.
    Want to find ways to make your student career less stressful and even relaxing? Sign up for this workshop to learn relaxation technique that is useful and easy to do. You will also get information on the health benefits from stress management techniques and demonstrations on energy/bodywork modalities such as: Reiki, Craniosacral Therapy, Healing Touch, and Massage therapy. No preparation is necessary. Come to learn and enjoy and gain the tools to become present, peaceful, centered, and balanced on physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual levels.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Preparing to Meet with Your Academic Advisor

    Library 10

    Presented by Harris.
    Learn the step-by-step process to get ready to meet with your academic advisor so you can register on time for Spring courses!

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Preparing to Meet with Your Academic Advisor

    Lewis Room

    Presented by DeLaet.
    Learn the step-by-step process to get ready to meet with your academic advisor so you can register on time for Spring courses!

Saturday, October 21 - Please contact Lori Helfrich at LHelfrich@Fontbonne.edu or call (314) 719-3663 for details.

  • TBA

    Service with the CSJs

    Off Campus

    Presented by Helfrich/Markway.
    Come and spend time serving the dear neighbor without distinction and getting to know some Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet while serving in neighborhoods of St. Louis. This will be offered as a service Saturday opportunity on October 21.

Monday, October 23 - All Campus Meeting in the Gym - No Janus Seminars

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Fake News: What Makes Quality Journalism & How to Decode the News?

    Library 05

    Presented by Flores.
    To be an informed member of society we have to stay up-to-date on current affairs. There is a lot of reporting and misinformation, especially online, how can we decipher what is quality and what is fake news.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Forest Park: Your Cheap Recreation & Education Center Down the Road

    Library 06

    Presented by Glenshaw.
    Having fun on a student budget can be tricky but we have an ace up our sleeve-Forest Park. The park itself and its many institutions offer a vast array of opportunities for fun and education. On the surface of it, we all know how amazing Forest Park is but how often do we use it and really take advantage of all that this park has to offer? I moved to St. Louis in 1995 but it was not until the early 2000s that I really began to use the park. I wish I had not let those years go by without getting to learn what the park offered. I volunteer for Forest Park Forever and have to come to know the park and its institutions well. I hope to share my knowledge of and enthusiasm for Forest Park and all it offers and provides.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Preparing to Meet with Your Academic Advisor

    Library 10

    Presented by DeLaet.
    Learn the step-by-step process to get ready to meet with your academic advisor so you can register on time for Spring courses!

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Preparing to Meet with Your Academic Advisor

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Harris.
    Learn the step-by-step process to get ready to meet with your academic advisor so you can register on time for Spring courses!

Friday, October 27, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Yoga in Daily Life: Benefits & Practices to Enhance Well-Being

    Library 06

    Presented by French.
    Yoga is an ancient set of practices involving much more than the traditionally thought of physical postures. In this seminar, students will learn about the numerous physical and mental benefits of yoga. Participants will also gain strategies that may foster an increased sense of focus, calm, and balance in their daily lives. Although we will not fully engage in a physical practice, students are encouraged to wear comfortable clothing and should expect to try mini versions of techniques presented throughout class. This seminar will be led by Dena French, a long time practitioner of yoga who is registered with Yoga Alliance as an RYT-200 level teacher. Dena discovered yoga during her first year of college when she enrolled in a class for required PE credit. She is excited to share concepts of yoga with college students who might benefit from adding the practice to their daily lives.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Preparing to Meet with Your Academic Advisor

    Library 10

    Presented by DeLaet.
    Learn the step-by-step process to get ready to meet with your academic advisor so you can register on time for Spring courses!

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Preparing to Meet with Your Academic Advisor

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Harris.
    Learn the step-by-step process to get ready to meet with your academic advisor so you can register on time for Spring courses!

Monday, October 30, 2017 - Pre-Registration Week Begins: Meet with Your Academic Advisor

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Choosing a Major, Choosing Freedom

    Library 05

    Presented by Eiler.
    What does a beginning college student have in common with the main character Rey in Star Wars VII? In a word – freedom. But, like Rey, you are not only free to choose your own future, you are completely alone in your responsibility to choose it. With freedom comes the power to choose. And with choice comes the responsibility of owning your decisions. This seminar will explore the challenges of choosing the major that will impact the rest of your life.

    Between right now and retirement, you will spend approximately 35% of all waking hours at work (work days consume 50% of waking hours). Assuming a correlation between college major and future employment, your choosing a major is one of the biggest decisions you’ll ever make. Only you can make that decision. Only you can be credited or blamed – that’s both scary and empowering! Kind of a big deal, eh?!?! Welcome to college.

    And how should you choose a major? Should you listen to your parents, teachers or advisors? Choose something practical? Copy your friends? Though these things can matter, they can also be detrimental to any path that does not include the most important perspective – YOURS! But, just as Rey is asked in the Star Wars VII trailer, we’ll ask you: “Who are you?” Your answer to that question is important, and has a lot to do with choosing the right major.

    This workshop will pursue three main goals: to deconstruct the self in order to better understand it; to define happiness and what it means for you; and, finally, to consider possible majors that reflect your answers to the previous two goals. Choose a major without thinking and enjoy regret for the rest of your life – that is the path to the dark side. The path to the light requires contemplation and forethought – this is your life, and you’re free to choose!

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Learning How to Learn

    Library 06

    Presented by Simons.
    This foundational workshop will help students explore how the brain learns. Areas covered in this workshop include: learning styles, preparation of the brain, memory, and focus. By learning the basics of how the brain acquires and analyzes new information, students will be better able to adapt themselves to learning in the college environment. This workshop is designed for all students.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Interested in Being a Business Major?

    Library 10

    Presented by Johnson.
    Considering a major or minor in the Eckelkamp College of Global Business?  Meet with Jay Johnson, dean of the college, to hear about the different programs and options available to you as you help find your major.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Who/What is a Registrar and Why Should I Care?

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Carruthers.
    Students who are new to college often wonder who or what is a Registrar and why they/it matter in the college experience. In this session, students will learn about the mission and purpose of the Office of the Registrar including what services we provide to students. Additional topics for discussion will include the University catalog and how the Registrar’s Office functions relate to other Student Services offices on campus. We will also plan to take a look at Griffinnet and MyFontbonne to see what information is there that comes from the Registrar’s Office so students are fully informed of the resources that are always at their fingertips.

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Woman in a Man's Industry

    Library 05

    Presented by Buckel.
    How to be a successful woman in a male dominated field. Discussion on missteps and important strategies to climb the male ladder. As a female athletic director, I have experienced a lot of challenging moments that I never expected to experience as well as have often been the only woman with a seat at the decision-making table. I will share my experiences with our students, both male and female, in hopes to better prepare them for the hurdles that they may face.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Understanding Your Learning Style

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Simons.
    Students will take a learning style assessment and will be provided with written material about tips and strategies to use for each learning style. The majority of the session will focus on discussion about each learning style with plenty of examples and opportunity for discussion.

Friday, November 3, 2017

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Resume Development for the First-Year Student

    Library 05

    Presented by Keller.
    Students will learn how to create a professional resume in this workshop; they will assess their skills and start the process of developing their own document. Students will understand the type of resume that is most successfully used in their career field, and the types of skills that are sought after by employers and graduate schools. This workshop will challenge students to reflect on their co-curricular experiences, leadership roles, and volunteer work to develop a resume that effectively highlights their skills and accomplishments.

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Connections & Community: Is a Communication Major Right for You?

    Library 06

    Presented by Norton.
    If you’ve wondered what communication studies and strategic communication is, and if it might be the right major or minor right for you, come discover more about the rich and flexible field at this seminar. The discussion will center on the exciting career paths of communication professionals, as well as the typical opportunities and experiences of students majoring in communication at Fontbonne.

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Are You 1G?

    Library 10

    Presented by Simons.
    Audience: Students who are first-generation (1G), meaning those whose parent(s)/guardian(s) did not complete a four-year degree. This seminar focuses on “first-generation” as a component of students’ personal identities that entails unique challenges and strengths. Through exploration of topics such as cultural capital, privilege, hidden curriculum, imposter syndrome, self-efficacy, and available resources first-generation students will develop a deeper understanding of what it means to be 1G. They will also develop a sense of pride and community related to their first-generation identity through discussions about their individual and collective strengths, the contributions first-generation students make to the campus, and by hearing from student first-gen speakers.

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.

    Financial Aid 101

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Kearney.
    General information regarding financial aid, financial literacy and other financial issues will be presented.

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Social Media Representation Workshop

    Library 05

    Presented by Keller.
    Students will have the opportunity to learn how to use social media platforms to their advantage. Students will learn to look at their own accounts from an outside perspective and also gain that perspective from other students, and be able to recognize if their social media persona matches the one they put forth in the real world, and learn how to make adjustments to present their most authentic self. Each student will look at how they can improve their accounts based on their values, and will have the opportunity to outline a plan on how they will present themselves digitally in the future.

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Serving the Dear Neighbor

    Library 06

    Presented by Gunn/Doyle.
    In this seminar, students will be led through a small service project involving assembling meals for a homeless shelter. During that time, instructors will guide students through a lesson on community service that includes: Why is Service important? (An overview of our connection to the Sisters of St. Joseph, our commitment as a Catholic university); What makes true Service? (An overview of the aspects of service including orientation, action, and reflection); How does Service impact yourself and others? (A short lesson on how making meals can impact the world as a whole and our own lives); and How do you get involved with service on campus and in the community? (An opportunity for students to learn about campus service projects and an invite to participate throughout the school year). This lesson will help students feel connected to Fontbonne’s mission of service while building community through a participatory service project.

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Crash Course: Punctuation

    Library 10

    Presented by Wohlford.
    Get a quick review of the basics of punctuation, including comma rules and other nuts and bolts.  Don’t go on guessing any longer!

  • 10 - 10:50 a.m.

    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Finley/Voss.
    Learn about different study methods and which ones work the best, according to research. Participate in a demonstration to see how retrieval practice can improve your memory for course content. The best way to study is to QUIZ YOURSELF!

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Interested in Being a Business Major?

    Library 05

    Presented by Johnson.
    Considering a major or minor in the Eckelkamp College of Global Business?  Meet with Jay Johnson, dean of the college, to hear about the different programs and options available to you as you help find your major.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Numbers Gone Wild!

    Library 06

    Presented by Roy.
    In this session, we will explore quantitative quantities that college students should consider in decision-making. These topics include the impact low grades have on GPA, the cost of having to repeat a course, how to calculate grade needed on final exam, the effect credit card interest may have on debt and other related topics.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Practicing Allyship: Race & Social Justice

    Library 10

    Presented by Voss.
    Becoming an ally involves a person of privilege actively, intentionally unlearning and reevaluating their beliefs, behaviors, and systemic influences to join in solidarity with a marginalized group of people (adapted from The Anti-Oppression Network). Allies work with those experiencing oppression in order to help end the system of oppression. Allies recognize that members of the dominant/privileged group are also harmed by the system of oppression, thus seek those benefits which come from ending oppression for all. In this seminar, through a brief process of self-reflection followed by some grounding thoughts on understanding race and racism, we will begin to explore those responsibilities, roles and behaviors needed to practice allyship.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Historical "Tour" of Fontbonne's Campus

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Matz.
    This seminar is about the history of Fontbonne’s campus and the role of the CSJs in its founding, with additional information about the life/contributions of John D. Ryan to the campus, in recognition of which Administration Hall was renamed to Ryan Hall in the mid-1920s.

Monday, November 6, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Connections & Community: Is a Communication Major Right for You?

    Library 05

    Presented by Norton.
    If you’ve wondered what communication studies and strategic communication is, and if it might be the right major or minor right for you, come discover more about the rich and flexible field at this seminar. The discussion will center on the exciting career paths of communication professionals, as well as the typical opportunities and experiences of students majoring in communication at Fontbonne.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Living Out Your Values

    Library 06

    Presented by Shields.
    Have you ever felt worried or anxious, and decided to avoid a situation because of that? All of us have experienced unpleasant thoughts and feelings, and how difficult they make life for us. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a form of counseling that aims to help individuals make choices based on their values, rather than to avoid unpleasant thoughts and feelings. The core of ACT is learning how to accept feelings and thoughts for what they are, leading to greater flexibility and more open choice-making. This seminar will introduce the basic concepts of ACT, with experiential exercises and short video clips to give participants a taste of what it ‘looks like’ to lead a values-driven life.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Practicing Allyship: Race & Social Justice

    Library 10

    Presented by Voss.
    Becoming an ally involves a person of privilege actively, intentionally unlearning and reevaluating their beliefs, behaviors, and systemic influences to join in solidarity with a marginalized group of people (adapted from The Anti-Oppression Network). Allies work with those experiencing oppression in order to help end the system of oppression. Allies recognize that members of the dominant/privileged group are also harmed by the system of oppression, thus seek those benefits which come from ending oppression for all. In this seminar, through a brief process of self-reflection followed by some grounding thoughts on understanding race and racism, we will begin to explore those responsibilities, roles and behaviors needed to practice allyship.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Living Well as a College Student

    Library 05

    Presented by Charles.
    Before arriving at college many students have had direct guidance from parents, from the school, or from a coach in organized sports. When coming in as a first year college student, taking care of oneself can be a shock. This workshop would help provide first year students with the tools to live well on their own. The content of the workshop will start out with discussing exercise. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations will be discussed, along with different forms of exercise addressing both formal and informal types. After providing the information to the participants, a group discussion will then be held surrounding different types of exercise that people take part in. Demonstrating the different ways people exercise and how they fit it into their busy schedules. The content will then move into healthy eating. Covering the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommended MyPlate and USDA recommended general nutrition facts about each food group. Blank sample forms of MyPlate will be given to participants to evaluate current eating patterns and what a balanced meal might look like for each individual. This leads directly into looking at new responsibility as a college student and the balance that it takes. New responsibilities will be taken directly from workshop members, and ideas for ways to handle and balance responsibilities will be discussed by the workshop attendees. Next, the content will contain different types of stress and how we deal with stress. Types of stress will come from the workshop participants and so will different ways of dealing with stress through group discussion. This portion would end with a short guided imagery for stress relief that the participants can take with them. Lastly, we would introduce the Health and Behavior Coaching that is offered on campus in the Counseling and Wellness Department. This will let the students know that they have support at the University to continue on their wellness journey. By giving the first year student’s access to these tools, it can improve their overall success not only in their first year, but also throughout life.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Who/What is a Registrar and Why Should I Care?

    Library 06

    Presented by Carruthers.
    Students who are new to college often wonder who or what is a Registrar and why they/it matter in the college experience. In this session, students will learn about the mission and purpose of the Office of the Registrar including what services we provide to students. Additional topics for discussion will include the University catalog and how the Registrar’s Office functions relate to other Student Services offices on campus. We will also plan to take a look at Griffinnet and MyFontbonne to see what information is there that comes from the Registrar’s Office so students are fully informed of the resources that are always at their fingertips.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Forest Park: Your Cheap Recreation & Education Center Down the Road

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Glenshaw.
    Having fun on a student budget can be tricky but we have an ace up our sleeve-Forest Park. The park itself and its many institutions offer a vast array of opportunities for fun and education. On the surface of it, we all know how amazing Forest Park is but how often do we use it and really take advantage of all that this park has to offer? I moved to St. Louis in 1995 but it was not until the early 2000s that I really began to use the park. I wish I had not let those years go by without getting to learn what the park offered. I volunteer for Forest Park Forever and have to come to know the park and its institutions well. I hope to share my knowledge of and enthusiasm for Forest Park and all it offers and provides.

Friday, November 10, 2017 - Registration Begins for First-Time, First-Year Students

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Stress Management/Reduction Workshop

    Library 05

    Presented by Phelps.
    Want to find ways to make your student career less stressful and even relaxing? Sign up for this workshop to learn relaxation technique that is useful and easy to do. You will also get information on the health benefits from stress management techniques and demonstrations on energy/bodywork modalities such as: Reiki, Craniosacral Therapy, Healing Touch, and Massage therapy. No preparation is necessary. Come to learn and enjoy and gain the tools to become present, peaceful, centered, and balanced on physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual levels.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    The Academic Hat Tip: Giving Credit, Understanding & Avoiding Plagiarism

    Library 06

    Presented by Whicker.
    This presentation will discuss the ethical use of others’ ideas, what plagiarism is, and how to be sure to avoid it (both the temptation to knowingly cheat and accidental mishandling of source materials). It will also explain the general principles of citation with a comparison of several citation styles and various ways to successfully integrate source material into writing.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Creativity and the Common Good

    Library 10

    Presented by Ridlen.
    This seminar will take a look at creativity and the role it plays in one’s identity, life style, growth mind set and ultimately its importance to the common good. Discussion will center around two short videos Embrace the Shake and Alike.

Monday, November 13, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Confidently Integrating Research in College Writing

    Library 05

    Presented by Muldoon.
    One of the challenges of college writing is effectively integrating research into papers while avoiding any possibilities of plagiarism. This seminar will be a hands-on workshop for students to apply key elements of MLA research format. Students will paraphrase and summarize material from different types of research texts, use different in-text citation strategies, and create a Works Cited page. Students will also read and discuss Fontbonne University’s policy on plagiarism and its consequences in order to be better able to use research in an appropriate way.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    What is Interfaith?

    Library 06

    Presented by Helfrich – Interfaith Group.
    The Fontbonne Interfaith Group will lead sessions on what interfaith work is, how to lead interfaith dialogue, and how to delve deeper into ones own faith background. The sessions will go into depth on different faith backgrounds, the differences between interfaith and intra-faith dialogue, and learning about religious pluralism.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Show Me the Money? Figuring Out What is Important (Lib 10)

    Library 10

    Presented by Keller.
    This interactive workshop uses a values card sort to help you assess your values, likes, and dislikes—and helps you figure out your ideal career path. This presentation will start with a short conversation on the definition and differences between one’s values and career-related values, where our values come from, and why it’s important to know one’s career-related values early in the process of making career decisions. We’ll also discuss why our career-related values change over time, helping students understand the importance of paying attention to what’s important to them and giving them permission to change their career ideas if and when their values change. You will walk away knowing their top six career-related values, and you will learn how to best reflect on what is important to you and how to use your values to guide their career research. To that end, you will write down three questions you’ll need to ask yourself and career professionals – and how to do that – in the next 2-3 years as you plan for the future.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    The 4-Year Plan: Creating Your Pre-Professional Portfolio

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Harris.
    Being a college student is a pre-professional, full-time job. Therefore, this presentation will examine the philosophy and benefits of creating a pre-professional portfolio, the documents and materials to include, and how students can use this portfolio to achieve their collegiate 4-year plan goals ultimately leading to graduation. Components of the college student experience, suggested methods, and tools will be discussed.

Wednesday, November 15 - Faculty General Assembly - No Janus Seminars

Friday, November 17, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Healthy Relationship 101

    Library 05

    Presented by Charles.
    In recognition of Intimate Partner Violence Awareness Month in November, this seminar will teach attendees about what it means to have a healthy relationship, consent and healthy sexual relationships, and more. College is all about new experiences: the start of a new life, new friends, new freedom, and new relationship experiences. Not surprisingly, romantic relationships are responsible for life’s happiest moments. For that reason, it is important to avoid problematic relationships that could jeopardize your college education. To help, we’ll identify qualities of healthy relationships in the context of common relationship experiences that students encounter during their first year in college. The workshop will include lecture, dialogue, and interactive work.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Approaching Course Evaluations

    Library 06

    Presented by Adams.
    Why do we have to do course evaluations?  Does anyone even read these things?  Meet with our chief academic officer to hear about the ways Fontbonne puts your course evaluations to use and what you can contribute to campus through filling out your evaluations conscientiously.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Serving the Dear Neighbor

    Library 10

    Presented by Gunn/Doyle.
    In this seminar, students will be led through a small service project involving assembling meals for a homeless shelter. During that time, instructors will guide students through a lesson on community service that includes: Why is Service important? (An overview of our connection to the Sisters of St. Joseph, our commitment as a Catholic university); What makes true Service? (An overview of the aspects of service including orientation, action, and reflection); How does Service impact yourself and others? (A short lesson on how making meals can impact the world as a whole and our own lives); and How do you get involved with service on campus and in the community? (An opportunity for students to learn about campus service projects and an invite to participate throughout the school year). This lesson will help students feel connected to Fontbonne’s mission of service while building community through a participatory service project.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Study Smarter, Not Harder

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Finley/Voss.
    Learn about different study methods and which ones work the best, according to research. Participate in a demonstration to see how retrieval practice can improve your memory for course content. The best way to study is to QUIZ YOURSELF!

Monday, November 20, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Are You 1G?

    Library 05

    Presented by Simons.
    Audience: Students who are first-generation (1G), meaning those whose parent(s)/guardian(s) did not complete a four-year degree. This seminar focuses on “first-generation” as a component of students’ personal identities that entails unique challenges and strengths. Through exploration of topics such as cultural capital, privilege, hidden curriculum, imposter syndrome, self-efficacy, and available resources first-generation students will develop a deeper understanding of what it means to be 1G. They will also develop a sense of pride and community related to their first-generation identity through discussions about their individual and collective strengths, the contributions first-generation students make to the campus, and by hearing from student first-gen speakers.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Forest Park: Where You Can Grow as a Student & Budding Professional

    Library 06

    Presented by Glenshaw.
    This seminar will help you start to use Forest Park for your work as a student and budding professional. In addition to the opportunities for recreation and relaxation, Forest Park is also a superb resource to use for both your course work and for your professional development. Regarding course work and the park, when you are working on a paper, project or presentation, think about how you connect to Forest Park itself and/or its many institutions. For example, sports management: There are sports leagues that use the facilities of Forest Park and the park has two golf courses, a tennis center and more. How are these leagues and facilities managed? Who manages them and how do the private companies interact and intersect with the city government and Forest Park Forever, the two organizations that operate the park? Almost every major, degree program and field of study can use the lens of Forest Park to find real world examples and applications. As far as professional development is concerned, Forest Park is home to: 5 top flight cultural institutions, 6 city government departments or agencies, an award-winning non-profit conservancy and 8 dining locations run by 7 different catering companies. Some of these institutions have unique specializations and opportunities abound for internships, part-time jobs, and volunteering to learn about their specific fields. In addition to these more specialized fields, most, if not all, of these institutions/organizations have similar departments in common such as: education, human resources, community development, marketing, financial management/accounting, fundraising, information technology, and many more. As such, opportunities again abound for internships, part-time jobs, and volunteering to learn about these areas that the institutions have in common.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Understanding Your Learning Style

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Simons.
    Students will take a learning style assessment and will be provided with written material about tips and strategies to use for each learning style. The majority of the session will focus on discussion about each learning style with plenty of examples and opportunity for discussion.

Wednesday, November 22 - Friday, November 24 - Thanksgiving Break - No Janus Seminars

Monday, November 27, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    What is Interfaith?

    Library 05

    Presented by Helfrich – Interfaith Group.
    The Fontbonne Interfaith Group will lead sessions on what interfaith work is, how to lead interfaith dialogue, and how to delve deeper into ones own faith background. The sessions will go into depth on different faith backgrounds, the differences between interfaith and intra-faith dialogue, and learning about religious pluralism.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    How to Be a Healthy Griffin!

    Library 06

    Presented by Hickman/Hagan.
    Good physical health can be a challenge to college students; weight gain (a.k.a “The Freshman 15”), lack of physical activity, poor sleep, homesickness, physical and mental illnesses. This class will be interactive and fun! Learn how to make a plan staying healthy while studying in college. Learn how to recognize three danger zones as well as learn the basic corner stones to good health.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Who/What is a Registrar and Why Should I Care?

    Library 10

    Presented by Carruthers.
    Students who are new to college often wonder who or what is a Registrar and why they/it matter in the college experience. In this session, students will learn about the mission and purpose of the Office of the Registrar including what services we provide to students. Additional topics for discussion will include the University catalog and how the Registrar’s Office functions relate to other Student Services offices on campus. We will also plan to take a look at Griffinnet and MyFontbonne to see what information is there that comes from the Registrar’s Office so students are fully informed of the resources that are always at their fingertips.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    How High Achieving Students Transition

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Wohlford.
    Contrary to what many imagine, students who were high-achieving in high school often have their own unique challenges as they transition to college.  Come and learn about some of those so you can be prepared.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Woman in a Man's Industry

    Library 05

    Presented by Buckel.
    How to be a successful woman in a male dominated field. Discussion on missteps and important strategies to climb the male ladder. As a female athletic director, I have experienced a lot of challenging moments that I never expected to experience as well as have often been the only woman with a seat at the decision-making table. I will share my experiences with our students, both male and female, in hopes to better prepare them for the hurdles that they may face.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Living Out Your Values

    Library 06

    Presented by Shields.
    Have you ever felt worried or anxious, and decided to avoid a situation because of that? All of us have experienced unpleasant thoughts and feelings, and how difficult they make life for us. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a form of counseling that aims to help individuals make choices based on their values, rather than to avoid unpleasant thoughts and feelings. The core of ACT is learning how to accept feelings and thoughts for what they are, leading to greater flexibility and more open choice-making. This seminar will introduce the basic concepts of ACT, with experiential exercises and short video clips to give participants a taste of what it ‘looks like’ to lead a values-driven life.

  • 11 - 11:50 a.m.

    Healthy Relationship 101

    Lewis Room

    Presented by Charles.
    In recognition of Intimate Partner Violence Awareness Month in November, this seminar will teach attendees about what it means to have a healthy relationship, consent and healthy sexual relationships, and more. College is all about new experiences: the start of a new life, new friends, new freedom, and new relationship experiences. Not surprisingly, romantic relationships are responsible for life’s happiest moments. For that reason, it is important to avoid problematic relationships that could jeopardize your college education. To help, we’ll identify qualities of healthy relationships in the context of common relationship experiences that students encounter during their first year in college. The workshop will include lecture, dialogue, and interactive work.